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Marianne. 20-something Sapphic reprobate; computer programmer and part-time adventuress by day, nerd heroine by night. Blog contains 100% Les Misérables and Les Mis-adjacent history geeking by volume. For other fandoms and eye candy of various kinds, see my everything-but-Les-Mis sideblog, shinelikethunder.

Tags that might interest you: resources, general history tag, meta, the actual june rebellion of 1832, queer history, paris, enjolras, victor hugo, romanticism.

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Reading List: Political Thought in the Age of Les Misérables

swutol-sang-scopes:

I don’t know whether this will be of interest to anyone, but last year Bristol university apparently taught a course on Political Thought in the Age of Les Misérables, and the (all in English) reading list is available online. Wow that’s a lot of books.

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drcalvin:

theladysasha:

kathryntaylorrose:

New Video!

Les Misérables Highlights at Dallas Theater Center

With the amount of footage they have…. 
Could it be? A DVD?

wow this is epic

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Paul Adam & Les Misérables

firmine:

or: Headcanons That Are Older Than Your Grandmother

I must warn you that every single attempt to type this out so far has resulted in hysterical giggling fits. I apologize in advance for the capslocking. It’s 3 in the morning here, ok, and I’m practically liveblogging this stuff…

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Anonymous said: What program do you use to read the scans of the French BD you posted? It looks fabulous!

CDisplayEx can handle most anything you throw at it!

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Anonymous said: I'm reading Sambre (thank you so much for the masterpost!) and in the third part, "Liberty", on the fifth page, with the revolutionaries there's a young blond-ish boy who first appears wearing a top hat and then saying "Will the people follow us? That's the question". And I'm probably looking too much into this, but, blond young boy, with a straight nose and full lips... my mind just jumped to Enjolras!

Same anon as before, some pages later, the curly haired boy (that reminds me of Courferyac for some reason) is making is speech, and- “For my mother is the Republic!” I know you’ve already read it all, and maybe I’m bothering you with these asks (I hope not, if so let me know) but yeah, there are so many similarities. I’m liking it a lot so far.

It wouldn’t surprise me ONE BIT, since this is a comic that pastiches Romantic art at every opportunity and quotes Lamartine poems verbatim. Les Mis plays a considerable part in the fictional iconography of revolution, and whether or not any of the individual characters are direct references to the Amis, there is a lot of homage going on in the portrayal of the revolutionaries and their rhetoric.

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Sambre - masterpost
What is Sambre? It’s a series of French comics about the tortured gothic love affair of Bernard Sambre, the son of a mightily fucked-up bourgeois family, and Julie, the red-eyed bohemian daughter of a prostitute, against the backdrop of the Revolution of 1848. In case my two previous reblogs of it didn’t tip you off, the art is absolutely to die for—flawless pastiche of 19th century Romanticism at its morbid, brooding, melodramatic best. And did I mention Revolution of 1848.
I know, I know, right? Why haven’t I heard of this before, and what’s the catch? The catch is that it’s almost impossible to buy outside of France, and has never officially been translated into English. Luckily for everyone, some kind soul over at the Pirate Bay has a scanlation on offer, and thus I present to you:
SambreVolume 1: Forever NevermoreVolume 2: I know you’ll comeVolume 3: Liberty, liberty…Volume 4: Must we die together?Volume 5: Cursed be the fruit of thy wombVolume 6: The seas of purgatory
The artist, Yslaire, has also done a one-volume graphic novel that has been translated into English and is available in the US and UK: The Sky Over the Louvre, set in 1793, concerning Jacques-Louis David’s commission to paint a representation of the Supreme Being. Go buy it if you can find it!

Sambre - masterpost

What is Sambre? It’s a series of French comics about the tortured gothic love affair of Bernard Sambre, the son of a mightily fucked-up bourgeois family, and Julie, the red-eyed bohemian daughter of a prostitute, against the backdrop of the Revolution of 1848. In case my two previous reblogs of it didn’t tip you off, the art is absolutely to die for—flawless pastiche of 19th century Romanticism at its morbid, brooding, melodramatic best. And did I mention Revolution of 1848.

I know, I know, right? Why haven’t I heard of this before, and what’s the catch? The catch is that it’s almost impossible to buy outside of France, and has never officially been translated into English. Luckily for everyone, some kind soul over at the Pirate Bay has a scanlation on offer, and thus I present to you:

Sambre
Volume 1: Forever Nevermore
Volume 2: I know you’ll come
Volume 3: Liberty, liberty…
Volume 4: Must we die together?
Volume 5: Cursed be the fruit of thy womb
Volume 6: The seas of purgatory

The artist, Yslaire, has also done a one-volume graphic novel that has been translated into English and is available in the US and UK: The Sky Over the Louvre, set in 1793, concerning Jacques-Louis David’s commission to paint a representation of the Supreme Being. Go buy it if you can find it!

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magicalgirlrobespierre:

march to Versailles and kidnap the royal family

have your brother wage war on your husband’s kingdom

stab the influential head of a media organisation while he’s taking a bath

create a new calendar

create a new religion

send your best friend to the guillotine

withdraw from public life for a month

accuse all of your colleagues of plotting against you

take advantage of the chaos around you and rise to become emperor of France

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insertatitlehere:

thecoffeetragedy:

crossingwinter:

This post speaks to me on a spiritual level.

Excellent graph! Fits most situations, if you don’t know whether to use 'tu' or 'vous', in French.

image

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pilferingapples:

angryfrenchpeacock:

VOUS PENSIEZ QUE J’AVAIS OUBLIÉ HEIN ???! GENS DE PEU DE FOI

LES MIS STILL DOESN’T TAKE PLACE DURING THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
THIS PEACOCK UNDERSTANDS ME.